Bettany hughes children


In new TV series Treasures of the World, the peripatetic historian tells the story of some remarkable places and people through historical sites and finds, as she tells Lyn Hughes. You travel to Greece, Malta, Gibraltar.

Istanbul and other spots in the Mediterranean. What was the goal of the series? We were determined that we get out into the world to celebrate it and find evidence to help us live our lives now. It just felt that more than ever that was something we should try to do. A lot of archaeologists, for instance, are still working and discovering things, but have nobody to share them with. So as soon as it was legal and safe, we got on a plane and formed a tight crew bubble [with production company SandStone Global] and went off.

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I know that when you look back at history, both at incredible world-class monuments and at surprising tiny treasures, there is always a big human story behind them; why they were made, how they were made, what they meant to the people who made them and what they mean to us. So we tried to pick places that we can relate to in life, such as ancient Olympia in Greece, to really look at the idea of competition in life; why are we driven to compete?

So, we ask why we love other people and how other people inspire us. You certainly bring out the human side. But why do you think history is so important? But also these are women and men who lived full and rich lives. So I think history is important and we also know that memory is incredibly important to us. Our whole brain is suffused with memory.

So in order to have a new idea, we have to access an old idea. But if you take a country like Greece, which clearly has so much history, how did you actually narrow down where to cover? So, we were driven by whether there was something new to say or show. The programmes also cover a big range of chronology. So we go right back to the Bronze Age and prehistory and then up to the birth of the modern age, the story of Greek independence in and Byron and all of that. One of the most startling things in the Gibraltar episode was the Neanderthal discoveries there We were excited by having access to the discoveries there.

One of the only benefits of the pandemic is that people have been so incredibly welcoming, so helpful, kelbly dovetail willing to collaborate. And there's this really beautiful notion, this ancient Greek notion of xeniawhich is friendship and how it is really important to welcome strangers into your country. And we benefited from that to the power of X in Greece, but also elsewhere because the pandemic has really made me realise we really do rely on other people all the time and the world is better if we help each other out rather than, you know, ignore one another.

But you do obviously get special access; if we go to the same sites will we be able to see the same things? Well we tried to choose places where almost without exception you can see it as a traveller. The Hypogeum, Malta's 5, year old underground burial temple Bettany Hughes.

Nearly all of them because I have spent the last 30 years travelling and researching. Like seeing the Neanderthal art; that was incredible. And, hearing stories about that community, and that next door there was a cave of hyenas and they found the bones of a young child in it. So obviously these hyenas had gone and grabbed one of the children. As with all traveling, some of the most nourishing and exciting experiences are the conversations that you have with people on the ground.Bettany Hughes reveals the surprising and invigorating history of civilisation's most influential ideas 'Eloquent and engaging Travelling backwards and forwards through time, she investigates how they first emerged and have evolved throughout history - and how those changes have shaped us.

In each programme, she discusses her chosenconcept with special guests from the humanities and sciences, discovers where these big philosophical ideas were born, and visits the street markets, churches, offices and homes where they continue to morph and influence our daily lives. We consider changing ideas of comedy by listening to a rat laughing and by giggling at schoolboy jokes from Ancient Mesopotamia; explores peace through images of war-torn Syria; investigates agony from conflict on the sports field to the battles of the heart; contemplate fame and how our attitude to celebrity has changed from Achilles to YouTube; and visits a Buddhist temple, the Palace of Westminster and the UK's largest food bank to find out why humans are hard-wired to hope.

Series 1 finds her looking at Ideas, Fame and Loveasking who came up with the idea of an idea? How has our attitude to celebrity changed over time? And what does love look like on a brain scan? She also delves into the perception of Agonyfrom sporting conflict to broken hearts, and investigates Justicefrom Babylon to the Old Bailey.

In Series 2, she examines changing ideas of Liberty and analyses Comedy with the help of a laughing rat and some Ancient Mesopotamian jokes. Plus, she shows poet Ben Okri some Hospitalitygoes to a women's football game and a synagogue in a quest to understand Wisdom and explores Peace through images of war-torn Syria and a talk with a dying man.

Series 3 sees Bettany probing her Psyche on Sigmund Freud's couch, finding Charisma at the Acropolis and in a bestselling novel, and inquiring into Irony in a club where it's banned. Pursuing Nemesisshe talks to experts on counter-terrorism and climate change, and she's aided on her hunt for Virtue by a former Greek Finance Minister and an aid worker back from Sierra Leone.

In Series 4, she takes her street philosophy to an ancient palace, a political think-tank and a prison kitchen as she considers Character. She ponders the changing idea of Harmony in mythology and on the battlefield, researches Narcissism in Victorian society - and at a hairdresser's, gets to grips with Technology at an electrical shop and in the future, and studies Hubris on a building nistune maf and aboard an Elizabethan sailing ship.

Are we hard-wired to believe things can get better - and why does our past hold the key to our future? Do we still believe in Mother Earth, and what role does disruption play in our lives? And who owns time, what does it mean, and how can we best make use of it? For the latest books, recommendations, author interviews and more. By signing up, I confirm that I'm over To find out what personal data we collect and how we use it, please visit our Privacy Policy.

View all newsletter.Helen is looking forward to being more independent though she's slightly nervous about making new friends. Exclusive partnership highlights the growing number of homeless young women in the UK and for the first time includes a Channel 4 branded entertainment social series Channel 4 and The Body Shop today reveal Unseen Kingdoms, an exclusive partnership that shines a light on UK female homelessness.

Here, you can find short biographies for each character in It's A Sin. Explain a bit about the programme. The wider picture is that this is about the formation and collapse of Isis, and the impact that the Isis ideology had on the recruitment of young men and women who left heir. This uplifting series returns to follow the journeys of several extraordinary singletons as they enter the dating circuit in pursuit of love.

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Press Search More. Images Listings Search the press site. Sort by Relevance Date. The Secret Life of Students - Helen Helen is looking forward to being more independent though she's slightly nervous about making new friends. The Body Shop partners with Channel 4 to launch first ever Christmas TV campaign Exclusive partnership highlights the growing number of homeless young women in the UK and for the first time includes a Channel 4 branded entertainment social series Channel 4 and The Body Shop today reveal Unseen Kingdoms, an exclusive partnership that shines a light on UK female homelessness.

The Undateables This uplifting series returns to follow the journeys of several extraordinary singletons as they enter the dating circuit in pursuit of love. Close the modal Share this video Please note terms and conditions apply, and are accessible via the link at the bottom of the page.It will take us on a European tour exploring ancient treasures and recent historical finds in places such as Greece, Turkey, Gibraltar, Malta and Italy. Now Bettany's new series promises just the same as it show us her fascinating insights into how the world used to live thousands how to become hijra years ago plus some pretty cool historical facts and sites.

So here's a guide to everything we need to know about Bettany Hughes' Treasures of the World Episodes will then launch on streaming service All4 after their weekly Channel 4 release dates.

As soon as we hear of an international release date we will post it, so do please check back. Channel 4 haven't released a trailer for the series. For the first episode, Bettany Hughes is in Greece uncovering the stories of Olympia, the birthplace of the original Olympic Games see picture belowand Aegae the birthplace of Alexander the Great and the biggest palace in the whole of classical Greece.

A holistic approach to health and happiness might seem like a very modern idea but Bettany reveals how the ancient Greeks were actually the masters of mental health and wellbeing more than 2, years ago.

She travels to the Sanctuary of Asklepios at Epidaurus, the very first health spa in Western civilisation. That idea of treating a person as a whole, of using art to heal, may seem super modern but the Greeks got there 2, years ago.

As well as ancient medical instruments, like tweezers and spatulas, also at the site is a vast amphitheatre that was used for mental health therapy. Also this week, Hughes visits other ancient Greek treasures, including Olympia and the origin of the Olympic Games, and Aegae, plus the birthplace of Alexander the Great and the biggest palace in classical Greece.

Bettany will discover how the Mediterranean island of Malta is a cultural hub laden with some of the world's most precious treasures in a later episode of Bettany Hughes' Treasures of the World. She'll show that Malta was where civilisations from East, West, North and South have met and cross-fertilised! Bettany and her team are the first to be welcomed in to film the incredible underground temple the Hypogeum. A burial place for up to individuals, where Bettany holds a replica of a 5, year old figurine of a fecund woman, representing the transition between life and death.

It's a 'royal love nest' house rarely entered and rarely filmed in yet it's where the couple alchemy 10 cheats said to have found real happiness.

Bettany also explores the deep World War Two tunnels and the Lascaris War Rooms, clambering down amongst tree roots, where hundreds of families sheltered through the war, finding their kitchen plates and bottles, and prayers — remnants of a time of incredible endurance. For the September 25 episode of Bettany Hughes' Treasures of the WorldBettany travels around the Mediterranean Islands where she joins a new archeological dig on Malta and takes a walk among the lovely lemon trees see picture below.

She also sees where another dig has uncovered a 2,year-old mask of Medusa on the sacred archaeological site of Delos in Greece. When workers currently expanding a metro station in the heart of Istanbul stumbled across ancient human remains a team of archaeologists were called in.

Bettany joins the fascinating excavation at Besiktas Metro Station. But these items tell us the early inhabitants of Istanbul were nomads, who travelled here across the Black Sea and the Balkans. Bettany is also granted special permission to film at the Topkapi Palace, known as the jewel of the Ottoman Empire. They are the first international team allowed to film this staggering seat of Ottoman Power for years.

She also visits the Basilica Cistern, the revolutionary sixth century water reservoir built under Instanbul's streets, and takes us on a tour of her favourite building on Earth — Hagia Sophia, which was completed in as the vast Christian cathedral of what was then Constantinople before it became a mosque when Ottoman Turks took the city in Most people imagine Gibraltar as just a rocky holiday destination with year-round sunny weather and, of course, monkeys.

But although Bettany Hughes does come face-to-face with a Barbary macaque in the third episode of her series, she also enters into the rock itself and explores a subterranean secret known as Stay Behind Cave.

Incredibly, the Gibraltar finds prove that Neanderthals survived 10, years longer than previously thought. I'm a huge fan of television so I really have found the perfect job, as I've been writing about TV shows, films and interviewing major television, film and sports stars for over 25 years. I previously worked on Woman and Woman's Own in the s. What to Watch. Nicholas Cannon. Categories UK Shows. Whattowatch Newsletter. Get the latest updates, reviews and unmissable series to watch and more!

Contact me with news and offers from other Future brands. Receive email from us on behalf of our trusted partners or sponsors. Thank you for signing up to Whattowatch. You will receive a verification email shortly.Bettany Hughes made her name as an English historian specialising in classical history author and broadcaster.

Her published books cover classical antiquity and myth, and the history of Istanbul. The documentary maker is active in efforts to encourage the teaching of the classics in UK state schools. Her many documentaries have toured ancient Greece and Rome, sometimes veering north towards Romano-Britain and south to Egypt. Her first book Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore looked into the legend of the face that launched a thousand ships.

The series found Hughes crossing boundaries between cultures in East and West and roaming inquisitively into Asia. According to her website, Professor Bettany Hughes is an award-winning historian, author, and broadcaster, who has devoted the last 25 years to the vibrant communication of the past. Her speciality is ancient and medieval history and culture. Her parents were in the theatre: she learnt early the importance and delight of sharing thoughts and ideas with a wider public.

Bettany won a scholarship to read Ancient and Modern History at Oxford University and then continued her post-graduate research while travelling through the Balkans and Asia Minor.

Her most serious illness happened during her childhood. They were in danger of failing due to a congenital problem. I had been sick and pale for a while but doctors just thought I was anxious about school. But when we think of her, we think: big breasted seductress bathing in milk. Often, even when women have made their mark and they are remembered by history, we are offered a fantasy version of their lives. Over time this word-idea evolved into the Greek xenia — ritualised guest—host friendship, an understanding that stitched together the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds.

She considers her work in the lecture hall and seminar room amongst the most important, and rewarding she does. I also have a soft spot for a bellini.

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My youngest daughter, May, 17, was diagnosed with coeliac disease last year so we have become gluten-free in solidarity. I believe in the benefits of a good massage. Wherever I am, I will seek one out.

Istanbul A Tale of Three Cities has already been translated into twelve languages. Bettany stands on the Women of the World Committee. She was awarded the Norton Medlicott Medal for services to History in In she was awarded the Distinguished Friend of Oxford Award for her contribution to the academic life of the University. She was also given the International Fem 21 Award for journalism. She is an honorary patron of Classics For All, a national campaign to get classical languages and the study of ancient civilisations back into state schools.

She is an advisor to the Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation which aims to foster large-scale collaborative projects between East and West. The English historian is also an honorary, founding patron of Classics For All — a national campaign to get classical languages and the study of classical civilisations back into state schools and a long-standing patron and supporter of the educational and campaigning charity The Iris Project.

The work of SandStone Global is values-driven and internationalist. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. January 3, Advertisement Contact.Bettany Hughes born May is an English historian, author, and broadcaster. Her speciality is classical history. Early life and family Hughes was born and brought up in west London.

She is the daughter of actor Peter Hughes and the sister of cricketer and journalist Simon Hughes. The couple have two children. She was awarded an entrance scholarship to St Hilda's College, Oxford, where she earned a degree with second-class honours in Ancient and Modern History. Hughes has written two books on Ancient Greek subjects.

It was also chosen as Book of the Year in several publications. Hughes has received numerous accolades for her broadcasting work. Hughes has been invited to universities in the US, Australia, Germany, Turkey and the Netherlands to speak on subjects such as Helen of Troy, the origins of female 'Sophia' and concepts of Time in the Islamic world.

She was also asked to chair the Orange Prize for Fiction, the UK's only annual book award for fiction written by women. Hughes is a long-standing patron and supporter of educational and campaigning charity the Iris Project, which has been promoting and teaching Latin and Greek in state schools since She is an honorary patron of Classics For All, a national campaign to get classical languages and the study of ancient civilisations back into state schools in the UK launched in She is also an advisor to the Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation which fosters large-scale collaborative projects between East and West.

Inshe was made a Distinguished Friend of the University of Oxford.

Who is Bettany Hughes?

Biography Lists News Also Viewed. Bettany Hughes. The basics. The details from wikipedia. Works Television. United Kingdom. Social science.Learn How rich is She in this year and how She spends money? Also learn how She earned most of networth at the age of 53 years old? We recommend you to check the complete list of Famous People born on She is a member of famous Broadcaster with the age 54 years old group.

At 54 years old, Bettany Hughes height not available right now. Her net worth has been growing significantly in So, how much is Bettany Hughes worth at the age of 54 years old? She is from British. We have estimated Bettany Hughes's net worth, money, salary, income, and assets. Inshe was made a Distinguished Friend of the University of Oxford. Hughes was born and brought up in west London.

She is the daughter of actor Peter Hughes and the sister of cricketer and journalist Simon Hughes. The couple have two children.

Hughes has been invited to universities in the US, Australia, Germany, Turkey and the Netherlands to speak on subjects such as Helen of Troy, the origins of female "Sophia" and concepts of time in the Islamic world.

She was also asked to chair the Orange Prize for Fiction, the UK's only annual book award for fiction written by women. Hughes has received numerous accolades for her broadcasting work. Inshe was awarded the Naomi Sargant Special Award for excellence in educational broadcasting, and in was specially awarded for services to Hellenic culture and heritage by the Greek Department of Culture. She has also been awarded the Norton Medlicott Award for services to history by the Historical Association, of which she is an honorary fellow.

Hughes is a long-standing patron and supporter of educational and campaigning charity the Iris Project, which has been promoting and teaching Latin and Greek in state schools since She is an honorary patron of Classics For All, a national campaign to get classical languages and the study of ancient civilisations back into state schools in the UK launched in She is also an advisor to the Foundation for Science, Technology and Civilisation which aims to foster large-scale collaborative projects between East and West.

Bettany Hughes OBE born 14 May is an English historian, author and broadcaster, specialising in classical history. Bettany Hughes Broadcaster. Bettany Hughes fans also viewed:. Peter Rowell. Dan Benjamin. Jean-Pierre Hautier. William Mark Simmons. Graeme Smith. Tommy Walsh. Hughes is the daughter of actor Peter Hughes and the sister of cricketer and journalist Simon Hughes.

Hughes is married to Adrian Evans; the couple have two. Together, Bettany and Adrian have two children, daughters named May, 20, and Sorrel, See Also: Where is The June Motel from Netflix?

Prices. Bettany Hughes's husband is Adrian Evans who is 63 years old. The couple have two children together, although less is known about their family. We have two daughters: Sorrel, who's 19, and May, who's And in our marriage we have this incredible asset: my mother. She's always been. Professor Bettany Hughes is an award-winning historian, author and broadcaster, who has devoted the last 25 years to the vibrant communication of the past.

Historian, Author, Broadcaster · Bettany Hughes · Tea With B · US /UK, Audio & E-book of 'Venus & Aphrodite' out now · Istanbul: E-book & Audio-book out now · Greek.

She was born in in and brought up in west London, the daughter of actor Peter Hughes and the sister of cricketer and journalist Simon Hughes. Hughes has. She is married to Adrian Evans, 63, who was the Pageant Master for the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in The couple have two daughters. May, Emotional ties: historian Bettany Hughes on Greek myths, him to play piano and Dad has taught me, my brother Simon and our children.

My daughter Sorrel, who's 18, is a very good ukulele player – she bought this pink one last year for about £ She'll often just pick it up. First day of the long anticipated school holidays; persuaded my own children to have a reading day (no tv, IPad or messing with AI devices). We've had to do. Bettany Mary Hughes.

In more languages. Spanish Ralph Jackson and Bettany enerbiom.eu 3, × 2,; MB. 1 reference number of children. Bettany Hughes grew up in West London with her brother, the cricketer Simon Hughes.

The Ideas That Make Us

Her parents were in the theatre: she learnt early the. miraculously restored to life, and the healing of the ill child. Bettany Hughes is an award-winning historian author and broadcaster specialising in. by Kevin Lygo, Bettany Hughes, et al. | Apr 12, Spanish Edition | by Bettany Hughes, Tomás Fernández Aúz, et al. | Mar 3, Historian Bettany Hughes goes beyond the delights of teas and topiary to explore the daughter of one of the Kindertransport children whom Lord Bearsted.

It begins with the half-burnt fish, miraculously restored to life, and the healing of the ill child. Young Arieka is an unloved misfit, but as rumours of her. Historian Bettany Hughes travels throughout Egypt to learn about how the Nile River influenced Egypt's ancient civilization and allowed it to flourish.

A Greek Odyssey with Bettany Hughes. Episode 1. Friday, 12 June. 60 min | Documentary. Off the coast of Turkey, Bettany meets an underwater archaeologist.

Proving that this fabled figure is so much more than an avatar of commercialized romance, historian Bettany Hughes reveals the remarkable lifestory of one.